Monday, May 22, 2017

Hsieh Forbes Column: 3 Big Questions About AI-Guided Medicine

My latest Forbes piece is out, continuing last month's theme on artificial intelligence in medicine. It's entitled, "3 Big Questions About AI-Guided Medicine".

In particular, the three questions are:

1. Who will control (and have access to) individual patient data?

2. Will we know how the AIs arrive at their diagnoses and recommendations?

3. What will the AIs optimize for?

For more details on each, see the full text of "3 Big Questions About AI-Guided Medicine".


Sunday, April 30, 2017

Hsieh Forbes Column: "AI In Medicine: Rise Of The Machines"

My new Forbes column is now out: "AI In Medicine: Rise Of The Machines".

If current trends continue, medical care change over the next 20 years just as much as internet has changed life between 1997 and today.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Hsieh Forbes Column: Doctors Should Not Record Immigration Status Nor Gun Ownership

My latest Forbes column is now out: "Doctors Should Not Record Immigration Status Nor Gun Ownership In Patient Charts".

Patients routinely disclose sensitive personal data to their physicians. Doctors can and should be mindful of information that might someday be used against their patients by unscrupulous government authorities.

In particular, with increasing use of electronic medical records that can be data-mined by those with access, physicians can help protect the doctor-patient relationship by leaving some information out of the records.

Related earlier piece, “Why Doctors Should Not Ask Their Patients About Guns.”


Monday, February 27, 2017

Hsieh Forbes Column: People Confound Experts: Three Paradoxes Of Health And Human Behavior

My latest Forbes column is now out, "People Confound Experts: Three Paradoxes Of Health And Human Behavior".

I discuss three counter-intuitive or paradoxical results from recent health policy research, in which patients don't respond in the way that experts might have predicted.

For example: If you have a serious heart problem, you might do better if the top cardiologists are out of town.

For more details, see the full piece, "People Confound Experts: Three Paradoxes Of Health And Human Behavior"!

Monday, January 30, 2017

Hsieh Forbes Column: Health Freedom For Everyone, Not Just Women

My latest Forbes column is now out, "Health Freedom For Everyone, Not Just Women".

My basic theme is that free-market reforms (not government-run health care) will best protect our medical freedoms.

From the article:
I support abortion rights and reproductive freedom rights. I love that many participants in the marches don’t want the government dictating which medical procedures women may or may not receive.

I also hope that people recognize that government-run health care will inevitably mean government controlling which medical procedures patients may or may not receive. Whenever “somebody else” pays for your health care, inevitably “somebody else” will decide what health care you do (or do not) receive.
For more details, see the full text of "Health Freedom For Everyone, Not Just Women".



Tuesday, January 10, 2017

The Evolution Of Radiology

Dr. James Chang: "The evolution of radiology".

Yup, this seems about right! (Click on image to see full size version.)


Thursday, December 29, 2016

Hsieh Forbes Column: No, The Government Should Not Provide Health Insurance For All Americans

My latest Forbes piece is now out, "No, The Government Should Not Provide Health Insurance For All Americans".

I discuss a proposal from conservative health policy analyst James Capretta in which he argues, "The GOP Should Provide Health Insurance for All Americans". And I propose some alternative free-market approaches that we can start implementing in 2017.

For more details, see the full text of "No, The Government Should Not Provide Health Insurance For All Americans".

And Happy New Year to all our supporters and subscribers!

Monday, November 28, 2016

Hsieh Forbes Column: UK Vs US Aortic Aneurysm Deaths

My latest Forbes pieces is now out: "Patients With Aortic Aneurysms More Likely To Die In The UK Than The US".

I discuss a recent New England Journal of Medicine study which showed that if you have an abdominal aortic aneurysm (aka "AAA") in the US vs the UK, the UK patients have to wait longer for surgery, and the aneurysms don't get repaired until they are larger (and more at risk of rupture.)

The researchers conclude: "Rates of aneurysm rupture and aneurysm-related death were significantly higher in England than in the United States".

I also cover three natural follow-up questions:

1) Were US surgeons jeopardizing their patients by operating more aggressively than UK surgeons?

2) Did the UK nationalized health system contribute to the lower rates of appropriate surgery in the UK?

3) Will US government policies incentivize American surgeons towards more — or less — appropriate treatments?

For more details, read the full text of "Patients With Aortic Aneurysms More Likely To Die In The UK Than The US".